Reactive Minds
3-day workshop
the hyper-sexualisation of the consumer market.
This project seeks to question the trend to objectify the human body and our acceptance of it. Three pieces expose the presence of sexuality in popular culture, such as in advertising, music and cinema.
Where and how do we draw the line between what is censored and what’s explicit?
Body
Body
Body
Body
Body
Body
Market
Market
Market
Market
Market
Market
Money
Money
Money
Money
Money
Money
Flesh-Up
This piece shows the raw treatment toward the human body in the world of advertising. In a neo-capitalist world, invaded by out of measure consumerism and media manipulation, advertising determines not only our tastes, but our way of thinking of ourselves and relating to others.
We’re taught to desire objects and adopt ideas far from our real character. All product or idea are thought out with the aim of selling.
Will we eventually become another object on sale? Flesh-Up is most complete catalogue to choose a nose, a look, the best feet, etc. If you don’t like yourself you can change!
Listen, kids
This is a criticism to our behaviour and awareness about the message behind lyrics of certain music genres.
It sets aside from the general aesthetics, formed by the music video, melody and lyrics, to emphasise each of these messages separately. It reflects, amplifies and exaggerates our understanding of the body in this parallel world, both visually and in narrative. Its proposal is to reinforce this consciousness through the impregnation of the narrative (lyrics) on basic objects for people, such as clothes. These are also directly related to the visual message.
Listen, kids questions whether the message spread is relevant to our identity, and what includes a social identity.
No Apto
At what age are we ready psycho-socially to watch explicit content? Not Apt shows our contradiction in the popular film rating, through a chromatic representation of different age ranges. Each range contains a sequence that puts in evidence the subjective nature of valuing the audience’s maturity. It reflects the ambiguity in the classification by age-groups. This is only an orientative standard  of what society think is correct. The true responsibility falls on our parents and on each person.
Work process